Countdown to The Dark Knight Rises

This is an exciting week. The Dark Knight Rises comes out on Friday and from what I have read online, is supposed to kick some serious butt. The movie is getting released here in Germany only on 24th of this month, but still, I have begun my prep already. Apart from re-reading many comic books (Vengeance, Knightfall, Cataclysm, No Man’s Land etc.), I am also revamping my desktops and laptops to celebrate the release.

This post is related to such a revamp. The following screenshot is from my EEE box powered by OpenBSD 5.1 and runningĀ  ScrotWM. I just thought this minimal Bane wallpaper fit perfectly and the terminal colors are one of my ancient creations from years back, called, Colorado. Since, there were a few requests for the colors, let me post them right here. The media player is vitunes, which is an MPlayer frontend that has vi-like key bindings. I have spoken about it in one of my previous posts.

Without further ado, here is the screenshot. Click on the image for full view.

Preparation for The Dark Knight Rises

You can get the terminal colors from the following link.

Colorado Colors

If there’s any other information needed, please drop a note.

By the way, The Dark Knight Rises soundtrack is mega awesome. Gotham’s Reckoning and Imagine the Fire are spine-tingling.

Starting with this post, I will add more Batman related posts for the next couple of days. Keep watching this space.

VT220 – Nostalgia

I went nuts with trying out different color combinations to mimic a VT 220 setup on my OpenBSD rig. You can see seven different color variations. Brown, Light Yellow, Light Red, Light Cyan, Light Blue, Light Green and a darker shade of Cyan. I prefer to alternate between darker shade of Cyan and Brown. True, brown reminds us of something else, but it works well with the font. So, does darker cyan. Of the lighter variations, green is my favorite. Click on the image for full view.

VT 220 Madness!

Here is another working shot of the rig with the brown variant.

Current Setup

Drop a note if more information is needed.

 

Boring Day!

Today, we moved from the first floor to the fourth floor in the hospital. It was pretty hectic. Finally, I can sit back and relax for a while. Posting a current shot of my EEE. I have only my EEE machine with me at the hospital. It is powered by OpenBSD 5.1 and ScrotWM is the window manager. The machine is brilliant and OpenBSD just flies on this nifty box. I have had no problems whatsoever with upgrades. Started out with OpenBSD 4.5 and now it is the latest 5.1. No reinstalls, just simple upgrades and some minor hacks here and there.

As far as the details of the shot goes, the font is still Dina medium and bold, pixelsize 15. Colors are gentoo colors. If any other information is needed, please drop a note.

Now, to the screenshot. As usual, click on the image for full view.

Bats Family-Version 2

Beep X11 Font – Another Mod of Neep

Let us continue with the X11 font series. This font is called Beep. Again, it is a mod of Jim Knoble’s Neep. A few characters modded according to personal taste, like, “a” and “i”. This is a pixelsize 11 font and comes only in medium version. So don’t try to use it in the bold form or another pixelsize. It’s a bit bigger than Dweep and can be used on a relatively higher resolution screen without any issues. As usual, I have uploaded the font to my github. Please click on the image to get to my github.

Beep X11 Font - Mod of Neep

This is a screenshot of the font in action on a 1600×900 screen. Click on the image for full view.

Beep in action FreeBSD 9.0-Release

As it must be evident, most of my fonts are just minor mods here and there. I will release a font that I have made right from scratch next month. I have to think about a kickass name first. If you need any other information, please let me know using the comment feature.

Marathonmod X11 Font – Nucleus Family

pf hacking went great. Just filed a test report with my friend. Slept well. Long day ahead. Anyway, I would now like to release my third font. It is called Marathonmod, which is again a minor mod of Marathon from the nucleus font family. It comes in two variants – normal and semi-condensed. What you see on the screenshot is the semi-condensed version. It’s a tall font with a minor height difference between alphabets and numbers. Some special characters are not available, but it will be worked out in the next release. It never strained my eyes and I never had a problem with multiple head setups.

Now, without further ado, here is a screenshot. Note the marginal height difference between the letters and numbers. Click on the image to go to my github page, where the font is hosted.

Marathonmod X11 Font

Here is another screenshot with the font in action. ScrotWM on FreeBSD 9.0 amd64.

Marathonmod Font in Action

Chocolate milk and candy bars beckon – Breakfast for Champions! Till then.

Stderr – zsh

Zsh is a great shell that simplifies a lot of tasks and brings in a ton of features (if you intend to use a load of modules and shell functions that is). For instance, the live command coloring capability is pretty awesome. The following post is just a simple illustration of a simple, single line added to my .zshrc and what it does.

When you type in a wrong command, the shell will throw a stderr command not found. The output would be the same color as the foreground color that you use on your terminal (The command color is red here because of live command highlighting – More on this at the end of the post). Like this:

Stderr - Default

But, wouldn’t it be nice to color the output as well? I want my colors man. See what I mean?

Stderr - Colored

All I had to do was add a line in my .zshrc on my BSD boxes.

Line in .zshrc

It should be self-explanatory I guess. Here’s the entry again for you Ctrl+C, Ctrl+V ‘ers.

exec 2>>( while read X; do print "\e[91m${X}\e[0m" > /dev/tty; done & )

With live command coloring, colored stderr is repetitive though. Since, typing a wrong command would automatically let the command stand out in red, indicating that it is not a proper command. But if you don’t want live syntax highlighting, the above feature would be of use.

Google Search – DragonFly BSD

I just had a look at my stats page and I see that a few people come here searching for DragonFly BSD and TWM. I believe, I mentioned briefly about TWM before. Anyway, let me add a bit more. I still use DragonFly BSD on one of my rigs at home. Hammer is pretty awesome. I don’t have any other WM running on that box. It’s just good old TWM. I even had DragonFly BSD running successfully on my EEE 1000H sometime back. It was solid, wireless performance was a bit troubling though, but I had a minor hack to automatically reattach if the driver gave up. I had this screenshot from my EEE over at devart and I am posting it right here again. If you need something to be resurrected, like my old configs, etc., do comment. TWM is pretty easy to configure and with vdesk, virtual desktops are child’s play. Anyway, click on the image for full view.

TWM on DragonFly BSD powered EEE 1000H

I will push this twm theme to my github tonight. If anything else is required, please let me know.