Countdown to The Dark Knight Rises

This is an exciting week. The Dark Knight Rises comes out on Friday and from what I have read online, is supposed to kick some serious butt. The movie is getting released here in Germany only on 24th of this month, but still, I have begun my prep already. Apart from re-reading many comic books (Vengeance, Knightfall, Cataclysm, No Man’s Land etc.), I am also revamping my desktops and laptops to celebrate the release.

This post is related to such a revamp. The following screenshot is from my EEE box powered by OpenBSD 5.1 and running  ScrotWM. I just thought this minimal Bane wallpaper fit perfectly and the terminal colors are one of my ancient creations from years back, called, Colorado. Since, there were a few requests for the colors, let me post them right here. The media player is vitunes, which is an MPlayer frontend that has vi-like key bindings. I have spoken about it in one of my previous posts.

Without further ado, here is the screenshot. Click on the image for full view.

Preparation for The Dark Knight Rises

You can get the terminal colors from the following link.

Colorado Colors

If there’s any other information needed, please drop a note.

By the way, The Dark Knight Rises soundtrack is mega awesome. Gotham’s Reckoning and Imagine the Fire are spine-tingling.

Starting with this post, I will add more Batman related posts for the next couple of days. Keep watching this space.

Boring Day!

Today, we moved from the first floor to the fourth floor in the hospital. It was pretty hectic. Finally, I can sit back and relax for a while. Posting a current shot of my EEE. I have only my EEE machine with me at the hospital. It is powered by OpenBSD 5.1 and ScrotWM is the window manager. The machine is brilliant and OpenBSD just flies on this nifty box. I have had no problems whatsoever with upgrades. Started out with OpenBSD 4.5 and now it is the latest 5.1. No reinstalls, just simple upgrades and some minor hacks here and there.

As far as the details of the shot goes, the font is still Dina medium and bold, pixelsize 15. Colors are gentoo colors. If any other information is needed, please drop a note.

Now, to the screenshot. As usual, click on the image for full view.

Bats Family-Version 2

Beep X11 Font – Another Mod of Neep

Let us continue with the X11 font series. This font is called Beep. Again, it is a mod of Jim Knoble’s Neep. A few characters modded according to personal taste, like, “a” and “i”. This is a pixelsize 11 font and comes only in medium version. So don’t try to use it in the bold form or another pixelsize. It’s a bit bigger than Dweep and can be used on a relatively higher resolution screen without any issues. As usual, I have uploaded the font to my github. Please click on the image to get to my github.

Beep X11 Font - Mod of Neep

This is a screenshot of the font in action on a 1600×900 screen. Click on the image for full view.

Beep in action FreeBSD 9.0-Release

As it must be evident, most of my fonts are just minor mods here and there. I will release a font that I have made right from scratch next month. I have to think about a kickass name first. If you need any other information, please let me know using the comment feature.

Marathonmod X11 Font – Nucleus Family

pf hacking went great. Just filed a test report with my friend. Slept well. Long day ahead. Anyway, I would now like to release my third font. It is called Marathonmod, which is again a minor mod of Marathon from the nucleus font family. It comes in two variants – normal and semi-condensed. What you see on the screenshot is the semi-condensed version. It’s a tall font with a minor height difference between alphabets and numbers. Some special characters are not available, but it will be worked out in the next release. It never strained my eyes and I never had a problem with multiple head setups.

Now, without further ado, here is a screenshot. Note the marginal height difference between the letters and numbers. Click on the image to go to my github page, where the font is hosted.

Marathonmod X11 Font

Here is another screenshot with the font in action. ScrotWM on FreeBSD 9.0 amd64.

Marathonmod Font in Action

Chocolate milk and candy bars beckon – Breakfast for Champions! Till then.

Illogical!

They need love too!

I cannot believe how people can throw away their computers when they are working fine. Last month, as I was walking along the street where I live, I saw a gentleman discarding some of his old stuff. Right when I was passing by, he brought a laptop out and threw it away. I asked him what was wrong with the machine. He said it was not working (That doesn’t say anything, of course). Then I asked him if I could take a look. He said it was ok. It was a relatively new laptop from Dell and I took it home for testing. First thing I realized was that the hard drive connector was loose. Once I sorted that out, it was absolutely fine. The machine started fine after that. No problems whatsoever.

So I took the machine back to the gentleman and told him I fixed it. But he was not interested and told me with a straight face that he doesn’t take something back after having thrown it away. Quite a philosophy I must add. So, I took it home and upgraded the RAM and did some minor quirks here and there and it was ready for its life v 2.0.

My first choice was FreeBSD, which wouldn’t even boot. OpenBSD worked fine up until hard drive recognition. It wouldn’t budge. So, my next choice was NetBSD. Well, what would you know, it installed just fine. Next up was X, followed by pkgsrc. No issues. Only issue was wireless card. It comes with a Broadcom chip that doesn’t have support. But I had a spare Ralink USB wireless adapter, which was pretty easy to set up. Took the machine for a test ride, even LINPACK benchmarks gave satisfying results. Wireless worked fine too. So, another machine salvaged.

Since it was Christmas time, like the year before, wanted to donate this machine as well. I found a smart kid from a not so well to do family through one of my friends and donated it to him. It was totally satisfying to see how happy he was. He has never used BSD before, but he has worked with Linux for a long time. So I gave him a crash course on BSD and NetBSD in particular.

Here is a screenshot from the laptop before I gave it to him. Click on the image for full view. Window manager is ScrotWM and the font is Dash, which is a mod of the famous font, Smooth (from misc family). I will release it sometime this month.

NetBSD 5.1 on the donated laptop

That makes it 28 computers donated until end of last year. Let’s see how it is this year.

Scrotwm – Linux

Continuing with the Scrotwm rant. Naturally I have moved to scrotwm on my Linux boxes as well. Installing scrotwm in Linux is a little bit tricky, since a certain lorder script is neede first to successfully run make, and generate the scrotwm binary. I am not going to explain it right here. Instead I will simply link a great howto posted over at frostglow. This howto talks about Gentoo, but the method will work on any Linux distribution. Follow the link below for a detailed howto.

Compiling scrotwm 0.9.5 on Gentoo Linux

Here is a supporting screenshot of scrotwm running on my Lunar Linux box. Click on the picture for full view. The colors are from thayer, and available in my .Xdefaults over at github.

scrotwm-thumb

ScrotWM – Mission Accomplished?

Don’t forget, its ‘W’. If you had looked into my screenshots posted here, you might have seen that I mostly use dwm, evilwm and fluxbox. Of course there are a couple of screens I had posted back when I was using XMonad as well. But the reason I went away from XMonad was the haskell dependecy and since I wanted something much lighter. True, I claimed XMonad for life and all, but please ignore it. 😀

I had been thinking about giving scrotwm a go for a long time. But never actually did. But aragon’s scrotwm FreeBSD port appeared a few days ago, so I thought of giving it a shot. Now I am sold.  I think I will stick with scrotwm as far as my tiling wm needs are concerned. I find managing windows much easier, and moving them requires no effort. Also the config can be changed runtime and recompile is not required. The best part, the default keybindings are so simple, that work straight out of the box, and the config file requires no complex editing. So I am using scrotwm predominantly alongside fluxbox these days. My mundane .scrotwm.conf is also available over at my github page. So interested people can download the same. Here is a screenshot of scrotwm in action on my FreeBSD7.2 powered EEEPc. The colors in this screenshot comes from the Warm Colors section in my .Xdefaults. The vim color scheme is dante and it is also available in my github page. Click on the picture for full view.

scrotwm1-thumb